History of Literature #111 – The Americanest American – Ralph Waldo Emerson

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In 1984, the literary scholar Harold Bloom had this to say about Ralph Waldo Emerson: “Emerson is the mind of our climate, the principal source of the American difference in poetry, criticism and pragmatic post-philosophy…. Emerson, by no means the greatest American writer… is the inescapable theorist of all subsequent American writing. From his moment to ours, American authors either are in his tradition, or else in a counter-tradition originating in opposition to him.” Who was Emerson? How did he become so influential? What did he unlock in American literature? And what can we take from his works today?

Learn more about the show at historyofliterature.com. Support the show at patreon.com/literature.

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History of Literature Podcast Ep. 57 – Borges, Munro, Davis, Barthelme – All About Short Stories (And Long Ones Too)

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What makes a short story a short story? What can a short story do that a novel can’t? Can a story ever be TOO short? The President of the Literature Supporters Club stops by to discuss the length of fiction, with some help from Lydia Davis, Donald Barthelme, Edgar Allan Poe, Alice Munro, Italo Calvino, Jorge Luis Borges, Ernest Hemingway, Roberto Bolano, Georges Simenon, Alberto Moravia, Augusto Monterroso, Jonathan Franzen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Saul Bellow, and Franz Kafka.

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Show Notes: 

Brand new! Check out our Facebook page at facebook.com/historyofliterature.

You can find more literary discussion at jackewilson.com and more episodes of the series at historyofliterature.com.

Contact the host at jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com or by leaving a voicemail at 1-361-4WILSON (1-361-494-5766).

Music Credits:

Handel – Entrance to the Queen of Sheba” by Advent Chamber Orchestra (From the Free Music Archive / CC by SA).

“Spy Glass,” “Sweeter Vermouth” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

 

HoL Episode 30 – More Conspiracy!

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What do Edgar Allan Poe, J.K. Rowling, William Shakespeare, Stephen King, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and Justice Antonin Scalia have in common? Jacke Wilson connects the dots with another look at conspiracy literature, literary conspiracies, and the people who love them. (Part 2 of 2.) Continue reading

Halloween with Edgar Allan Poe (and Annette Jung)

Enjoy!

And of course, don’t miss our own Edgar Allan Poe / Simpsons tribute. (No, not the one you’re thinking of. Think House of Usher, not The Raven.)

Restless Mind Show #2 – Tolstoy’s Halloween

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Taking another break from the history of literature for a Simpsons / Edgar Allan Poe mashup, Leo Tolstoy’s horse, and five lusty lizards blasted into space by the Russians.

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Today’s Comment of the Week: Halloween Lizards and the Accidental Listener

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Wonderful Listener Rose Red writes:

I thoroughly enjoyed [episode two of the Jacke Wilson Show], which I had to listen to because I knew the Beatles would be mentioned. I am listening to the Halloween one and I think I just wet myself laughing at your take on the geckos in space. “Do they not have feelings?”

Thank you! I’d like to think they do. And I know I have feelings, and your comment made me laugh and feel proud and…a little apologetic! I didn’t mean to cause an accident! Maybe some laundry postponement but that’s as far as I was hoping to go!

I hope things turned out okay. And of course I’m very tickled by the comment. Thank you, Rose Red!

You can listen to the Halloween episode by subscribing to iTunes, following this link to download the mp3, visiting this show page, or pressing this button:

Fun for everyone. Even our dark master Edgar (pictured above in a great drawing by KAL for Raven Beer) makes an appearance in a short story as heard through the filtering mind of Jacke Wilson Jr.

Happy Halloween everyone!

It’s the Jacke Wilson Show! Episode 1.1 – The Halloween Episode

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Here we go! Episode 1 of THE JACKE WILSON SHOW, an effort that has been seriously hindered by my complete lack of any knowledge about how any of this works. I had a lot of fun! And it’s yet another disaster! Ah well. Someone needs to take these tools away from me. (Or not! Who am I, Laura Miller, angry at the barbarians at the gate? Even the plebes deserve a few toys, don’t they? And a voice? They get to have their say, don’t they? Don’t they?)

Ahem.

Readers, I could use your help! Like I said, I have no idea how any of this works. Take a listen, and let me know what you think! Does it sound okay on your player? In your headphones? Honestly, I did my best. I hope you enjoy it!

Download the mp3 file: The Jacke Wilson Show 1.1 – The Halloween Episode.

Show Notes:

It’s the JACKE WILSON SHOW!

On this week’s show: lusty lizards in space, Leo Tolstoy, a lost scene from Macbeth, a new play for Bryan Cranston and Kate Winslet, Homer Simpson sings a Christmas Carol, a revised Edgar Allan Poe (with even MORE spookiness), and A History of Jacke Wilson in 100 Objects #13 – The Monster. Enjoy!

JACKE WILSON is the pen name of a writer whose books have been described as being “full of intrigue and expertly rendered deadpan comedy.” Born in Wisconsin, Jacke has since lived in Chicago, Bologna, Taiwan, Ann Arbor, Seattle, Mountain View, and New York City. Jacke now lives and works in the Washington D.C. area. Like his writings, the JACKE WILSON SHOW takes an affectionate look at the absurdities in literature, art, philosophy, great books, poetry, current events, hard news, politics, whatever passes for civilization these days, and the human condition (that dying animal). For more about Jacke and his books, visit Jacke at jackewilson.com.

Credits:

  • Danse Macabre Hook, Greta Sting, Fanfare for Space, Return of Lazarus by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
  • Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
  • The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe, adapted by Marjorie P. Katz, read by Jacke Wilson Jr.
  • The Lost Scene of Macbeth, Lusty Lizards (excerpts), and A History of Jacke in 100 Objects #13 – The Monster  by Jacke Wilson