History of Literature Podcast Ep. 57 – Borges, Munro, Davis, Barthelme – All About Short Stories (And Long Ones Too)

LOGO-COVERS

What makes a short story a short story? What can a short story do that a novel can’t? Can a story ever be TOO short? The President of the Literature Supporters Club stops by to discuss the length of fiction, with some help from Lydia Davis, Donald Barthelme, Edgar Allan Poe, Alice Munro, Italo Calvino, Jorge Luis Borges, Ernest Hemingway, Roberto Bolano, Georges Simenon, Alberto Moravia, Augusto Monterroso, Jonathan Franzen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Saul Bellow, and Franz Kafka.

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Show Notes: 

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You can find more literary discussion at jackewilson.com and more episodes of the series at historyofliterature.com.

Contact the host at jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com or by leaving a voicemail at 1-361-4WILSON (1-361-494-5766).

Music Credits:

Handel – Entrance to the Queen of Sheba” by Advent Chamber Orchestra (From the Free Music Archive / CC by SA).

“Spy Glass,” “Sweeter Vermouth” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

 

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4 thoughts on “History of Literature Podcast Ep. 57 – Borges, Munro, Davis, Barthelme – All About Short Stories (And Long Ones Too)

  1. Some of those questions have no answers, do they? All perception ^_^. I am reading Lydia Davis for the first time and intrigued. What I am reading from her is what others are calling ‘prose poetry’. All good though. A rose by any other name….

    Like

    1. Glad you enjoy it! She’s divisive but interesting. I thought Mike had the best summary: she has different modes. Sometimes she’s clever, sometimes she’s clever and sad, and sometimes she’s very angry. It’s interesting territory to spend some time in – Davisland!

      Liked by 1 person

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