A Thank You from Jacke…

…to the wonderful listener G, who left me this message:

“…I loved how you managed to make a link between ancient greek authors and a modern philosopher. That’s why I enjoy your podcast so much: you never know which way the episode will go. There’s something about the way you talk about books that I really enjoy.”

Thank you! That’s exactly what I’m hoping will resonate with people. A little bit of literature or philosophy, a few unexpected turns, and above all, sharing some ideas about the greatest books ever written.

You can find Episode 6: Greek Tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripedes), by following these links:

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History of Literature Episode 6 – Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides

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Author Jacke Wilson examines the works of three great Greek tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides – and attempts to solve the mystery of why Friedrich Nietzsche admired two of the three and despised the other.

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Sneak Preview: Nietzsche, Francis Ford Coppola, and the Greeks

Thanks to all of you who made last week the biggest one yet in the brief life of The History of Literature podcast. I’m not sure if Burt Reynolds or Aristotle deserves more credit. (Have you ever had the feeling that you’ve written a sentence that no one has ever, ever written? I just had that feeling.)

This week looks like a good one as well! Tomorrow, we’ll continue our journey through Greek tragedy by looking more closely at the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles (again), and Euripides. This time we’ll use the lens of the young Friedrich Nietzsche, writing his first book in his burgeoning philosopher/poet/madman way.

The trip through Nietzsche, Wagner, and the tragedians made me think of this unbelievably good sequence from Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now:

I don’t think Nietzsche would think much of most of our culture – but for what it’s worth, I do think he would have admired that sequence.

Onward and upward!

Quick Links:

 

The History of Literature Episode 5 – Greek Tragedy (Part One)

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How was tragedy invented? Why was it so popular in Ancient Greece, and what power does it have for us today? Using the discussion of tragedy in Aristotle’s Poetics, author Jacke Wilson takes a look at tragedies from ancient times to Shakespeare and Breaking Bad.

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