Two Genre Titans: When James Bond Met Philip Marlowe

So many great literary meetings have been lost to time. Here’s a fascinating one that wasn’t: Ian Fleming (master of the spy novel) discussing craft with Raymond Chandler (master of the hardboiled detective novel).

This is believed to be the only recording of Raymond Chandler’s voice.

Sit back, pour yourself something shaken not stirred, and enjoy!

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One More for Ziggy Stardust

For those of you who haven’t seen this…or even if you have…

Rest in peace, Mr. Jones. We will miss you.

Farewell, Sweet Spaceman

DavidBowie

Gutted.

What a life, though. He will be missed.

There are a million clips to look at, but here’s one of my favorites:

Episode 11 – The Upanishads (Part One)

Thousands of years ago, using techniques of deep meditation, Indian mystics conducted investigations into the powers of the universe and the nature of human consciousness, developing ideas about a single supreme god, the eternal soul, and the relationship of individuals to the spiritual cosmos. Their flashes of insight were passed along orally for hundreds of years before being recorded in written form sometime around 900 B.C. The best of these are now called the Upanishads, and their teachings have provided a philosophical tradition to hundreds of millions of practitioners of the Hindu religion as well as many other seekers of wisdom and truth. In this episode, host Jacke Wilson introduces his project to investigate the nature of the Upanishads and see what these ancient texts might (or might not) be able to provide to a modern-day seeker.

 

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Indian Literature – A Cosmic Feast (History of Literature Episode 10)

Recalling his own long-ago transition from China to India, our host previews our journey’s next stop, where we will immerse ourselves in the literature of a spectacular culture. Marked by classics like the Rig Veda (1500 – 1200 B.C.) and the Upanishads (ca. 900 B.C.), the Ramayana (ca. 550 B.C.), and the Mahabharata and the Bhagavad Gita (400 B.C. – 400), classic Indian literature is known for its deep engagement with universal questions like how the world was created, what our understanding of God is and can be, how we should treat one another, and what it means to be human. Jacke Wilson prepares our palate for a feast of Indian literature, one of the greatest achievements in the history of civilization.

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Show Notes: Continue reading

Confucius (HoL Episode 9)

Perhaps the most influential teacher in the history of the world, Confucius (551-479 B.C.) left a literary legacy that continues to inspire and provoke. Jacke Wilson takes a look at the historical Confucius, the impact that the five works known as the “Confucian canon” has had on China, and the collection of sayings and anecdotes known as the Analects.

You can find more literary discussion at jackewilson.com and more episodes of the series at historyofliterature.com.

Contact the host at jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com or by leaving a voicemail at 1-361-4WILSON (1-361-494-5766).

Music Credits: “Handel – Entrance to the Queen of Sheba” by Advent Chamber Orchestra (From the Free Music Archive / CC by SA).

Translation of Confucius’ Analects by D.C. Lau (courtesy of theNorton Anthology of World Literature).

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Here We Go! Top Podcast Episodes of 2015!

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Happy New Year!

On New Year’s Eve I expressed some gratitude and kicked off our countdown of 2015’s top podcast episodes. Today, I can reveal the

Top History of Literature Episodes of 2015

as selected by you, the listeners. For those of you new to the History of Literature, this might be the best place to start. Or just monkey around in iTunes or wherever and pick and author that appeals to you.

As longtime listeners know, the History of Literature podcast has two branches. In the first one, I dive into the great literary works of the past. In the second branch, which also goes by the name of the Restless Mind Show (sometimes), I talk about art, literature, life, the creative process, or whatever else is on my restless mind.

So without further ado, here we go.

The Top History of Literature Episodes of 2015

#5 – Battling the Beast

Introducing the wildly unqualified host, Jacke Wilson.

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#4 – The Epic of Gilgamesh

Starting our journey with the surprisingly modern story of an ancient warrior-king whose restlessness drives him to seek immortality.

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#3 – Greek Tragedy (Part One)

How was tragedy invented? Why was it so popular in Ancient Greece, and what power does it have for us today? Using the discussion of tragedy in Aristotle’s Poetics, author Jacke Wilson takes a look at tragedies from ancient times to Breaking Bad.

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# 2 – Literature and Loneliness

On the eve of a holiday, author and host of the History of Literature podcast Jacke Wilson considers the consolations that  total immersion in literature can provide.

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#1 – Homer

He was a blind poet whose stories of heroes and gods helped launch an incredible era of literary and cultural flourishing. History of Literature host Jacke Wilson takes a look at the influence that Homer had on the minds of Ancient Greece – and the resonance that the epic poems The Iliad and The Odyssey still have for us today.

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We have much more planned for 2016. Thank you again for all your comments, support, emails, and downloads – I am extremely grateful for everyone who has joined us in this journey!